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Dandies, Æsthetes & Flâneurs

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1890s Society [27 May 2005|02:38pm]

Dear members of    refinement

This is a quick note about a fascinating website maintained by the UK 1890s Society which might be of interest to some of you, especially if you plan to stay in London at some point. To add, on the 2nd of June they will be hosting a talk titled, "Oscar Wilde and Rebecca West" by Prof Margaret Stetz.

There you can also find  information about the society as well as useful links to:

  • Collections of 1890s materials (including AUCTION SALES, LIBRARIES, and MUSEUMS)
  • Art links (incorporating THE ARTS AND CRAFTS MOVEMENT, also INDIVIDUAL ARTISTS and ARCHITECTS)
  • Literature links (incorporating INDIVIDUAL AUTHORS)                               etc.
  • The website address is:

    http://www.1890s.com/

    Devotedly yours,

    fiorelli

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    [27 May 2005|04:54pm]
    I'm somewhat dismayed that the Wikipedia entry for "Dandy" begins:


    " A dandy is a man who rejects bourgeois values, devotes particular attention to his physical appearance, refines his language, and cultivates his hobbies. A dandy emulates aristocratic values, often without being an aristocrat himself, thus such a dandy is a form of snob. A dandy was differentiated from a fop in that the dandy's dress was more refined and sober. The practice of dandyism was a counter-cultural habit that began in the revolutionary 1790s both in London and Paris."


    Am I the only one for whom phrases like "rejects bourgeois values" and "counter-cultural habit" are grating, yet all too commonly applied to cultural history? Or have I simply sat through too many lectures that trace an anachronistic anarcho-Marxist thread through all of Western art? Can we rescue dandyism from "po-mo" academia? I'm curious.
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